Book Reviews November ’19

Wow another month dashed by … a few more books read, most of them well worth reading!!

Sing Sad Songs

Michael Beyer

What a sad song, a sad young man and yet he brings so much joy to a dysfunctional Norwall family.

Arriving as an orphan, his French family wiped out in a car accident Francois brings something special to his Uncles Family and his new adopted brother, Billy.

He is accepted as one of the Norwall Pirates, a softball team and investigators of weird crimes. Rapidly a relationship between Francois and Valerie, a fellow Pirate, develops … all looks wonderful until the Teddy Bear Killer hits town. Even allowing for the strange dreams and the clowns …. had I mentioned the clowns? Or the dreams?

Weird and Wonderful 5 Stars

The Secret Chapter (The Invisible Library series)

Genevieve Cogman

Another fun instalment in the adventures of Irene the librarian and book redistributor and her sidekick the elegant dragon Kai. This time they need to deceive the man who leads the gang formed to steal the picture that … It makes more sense the way Genevieve Cogman has written it. Even if you got bogged down mid-series it is well worthwhile reading this little gem!

Weird and wonderous 5 stars

The Human Trials: And the Thrill of Being Watched

Ava Lee Mosley

Ava, got into a conversation with me on Twitter, I said I’d read one of her erotic stories. I touch of mild sexploitation, other wise a gentle, consensual sex story. Not badly written, No surprises. No problem. No excitement.

Nothing to get excited about 3Stars

The Church of the Undressed: Paradise Regained

Theo Theodora

A rather lacklustre priest’s wife inherits a run-down naturist resort, with a few wacky members. We going to sell it, her husband decides. Then she has a revelation, God’s work is best done naked. A new church starts. The new church attracts lots of on line coverage and the attentions of the police.

Liberally sprinkled with biblical quotations the story treads that fine line between titillating fiction and worthy polemic and generally manages to keep its balance.

I am not sure who the target audience for this book is, the naturists know this already and the unconverted are unlikely to start the story.

A pleasant enough read.

Well written Well balanced and Well … 4Stars

The Salt Path

Raynor Winn

An absorbing and almost overwhelming story of a couple beset with problems. Just little things, his health is failing, being made homeless, bankrupt, jobless … easy stuff really (NOT!). With nowhere else to go decide to walk the Salt Path, around the coast of Cornwall, rough camping. There only means of support, Social security of about £50 a fortnight.

The book describes their painful adaptation to their new lifestyle, acceptance and finally … read it and find out. The writing is sometimes a little self-indulgent, but the narrative thread was sufficiently strong to pull me through these rare patches.

The best non-fiction I have read this year.

Compelling … 5 Stars